ungoliantschilde:

Bill Sienkiewicz.

(via infinity-comics)

comicsalliance:

HOUSE OF XAVIER: HOW THE X-MEN REPRESENT QUEER TOGETHERNESS [MUTANT & PROUD PART I]
By Andrew Wheeler
Mutants, Marvel Comics’ best known superhuman minority group, have long served as an imperfect analogue for real world minority struggles and injustices, from the concentration camps of Days of Future Past to the segregationist society of Genosha.
Yet it’s when X-Men stories are not trying so hard to draw parallels that they come closest to representing the experiences of one particular marginalized group. In the first of three essays in observance of LGBT Pride Month, I’ll look at the special resonance that mutants have with LGBT readers, starting with an examination of the X-Men as a representation of queer family and queer community.
In their first iteration, the X-Men created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby might have passed for blood relatives. It was 1963, and a uniform Anglo-Saxon whiteness was de rigueur for superheroes. That team did not follow a familial model at that time — that was the Fantastic Four’s gig — so what actually set the first X-Men apart was that they were classmates. Even so, a class photo would show five students who could well be natural cousins from a non-variegated family.
That changed in 1975 with the team’s “second genesis”. The team introduced in Giant-Sized X-Men #1 by Len Wein and Dave Cockrum were an international and multi-racial class that featured the first non-white X-Men, the first non-American X-Men, and the first X-Men who couldn’t “pass” for a traditional organic family.
Yet under new writer Chris Claremont the X-Men became a true family for the first time. Storm’s way of referring to her team mates as brothers and sisters — Colossus especially was her “little brother” — was an acknowledgement of the bonds of loyalty that defined the team. They did not only serve and study together; they also lived together in a grand palatial home, where they teased each other, played softball together, and shared their pains and joys.
Most of these characters were orphans, exiles, and outcasts. The X-Men became their surrogate tribe. That they did not look like a natural family served to underline the idea that these people chose each other.
All of this is a gay fairy tale — and a perfected version of what is, for many, a gay reality.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

HOUSE OF XAVIER: HOW THE X-MEN REPRESENT QUEER TOGETHERNESS [MUTANT & PROUD PART I]

By Andrew Wheeler

Mutants, Marvel Comics’ best known superhuman minority group, have long served as an imperfect analogue for real world minority struggles and injustices, from the concentration camps of Days of Future Past to the segregationist society of Genosha.

Yet it’s when X-Men stories are not trying so hard to draw parallels that they come closest to representing the experiences of one particular marginalized group. In the first of three essays in observance of LGBT Pride Month, I’ll look at the special resonance that mutants have with LGBT readers, starting with an examination of the X-Men as a representation of queer family and queer community.

In their first iteration, the X-Men created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby might have passed for blood relatives. It was 1963, and a uniform Anglo-Saxon whiteness was de rigueur for superheroes. That team did not follow a familial model at that time — that was the Fantastic Four’s gig — so what actually set the first X-Men apart was that they were classmates. Even so, a class photo would show five students who could well be natural cousins from a non-variegated family.

That changed in 1975 with the team’s “second genesis”. The team introduced in Giant-Sized X-Men #1 by Len Wein and Dave Cockrum were an international and multi-racial class that featured the first non-white X-Men, the first non-American X-Men, and the first X-Men who couldn’t “pass” for a traditional organic family.

Yet under new writer Chris Claremont the X-Men became a true family for the first time. Storm’s way of referring to her team mates as brothers and sisters — Colossus especially was her “little brother” — was an acknowledgement of the bonds of loyalty that defined the team. They did not only serve and study together; they also lived together in a grand palatial home, where they teased each other, played softball together, and shared their pains and joys.

Most of these characters were orphans, exiles, and outcasts. The X-Men became their surrogate tribe. That they did not look like a natural family served to underline the idea that these people chose each other.

All of this is a gay fairy tale — and a perfected version of what is, for many, a gay reality.

READ MORE

(via demoiselledefortune)

aplacetolovedogs:

This is so cute!!! Virginia, the pig fits right in with her Boxer pals

Visit our poster store Rover99.com

dragonsigma:

ranyakumo:

californiajones:

they look like they’re laughing


forget women laughing alone with salad, now we have salad laughing alone with itself

salad laughing alone with itself

dragonsigma:

ranyakumo:

californiajones:

they look like they’re laughing

image

forget women laughing alone with salad, now we have salad laughing alone with itself

salad laughing alone with itself

(Source: spacebetweentwolungs, via clawfoottub)

feredir:

I HOPE WE WERE THINKING OF THE SAME INTERVIEW…. 

(via pangeasplits)

Oh my. My aunt began texting me last night and informed me that she would be flying out to visit me for a weekend in Saturday and helping herself to lodging at my apartment. Not asking. Telling. I need to stop being such a pushover. But at least it will only be for three days and on my own turf. And my mom is on my side; joking that she should return the favor and just show up on my cousin’s doorstep with luggage someday.

cygnaut:

codenamecesare:

they-call-me-professor-x:

assvengrrs:

can we please talk about how bad charles is at improvisation 

In fairness, he isn’t really sober until the end of the movie. But it’s kind of cute how awful he is at this without his powers.

I don’t know, I thought the “acid” improv was a decent idea on Charles’s part to calm Logan down. Though maybe I just like it because he says it so hilariously. I especially crack up over the wincing way he says “Yeah…?” at the end. XD

The acid line is hilarious, but it’s pretty clear Charles never had to learn to lie convincingly as a child.

Also, before I leave for work:

Dear Charles Xavier,

While I adore biopsychology, reading my class material in my brain in your voice from time to time is just really calming and assuring and helps me understand and gain confidence in the concepts. Thank you!

"reblog if you ever actually used a phone with a “rotary dial” on it"

(via beggerprince72)

Wi-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch, wi-ch-ch, wi-ch-ch-ch-ch-ch……

And getting your finger caught under the metal thingy.

(via iwantthatcoat)

nines were such a paain

(via amindamazed) Oh my god how young are you people (via yahtzee63)

(via yahtzee63)